The Polite Puss and the Crude Pussy

The word puss has two separate meanings, one in reference to a cat and the other in reference to the face. The origins of puss as a cat appears to have been borrowed from Middle Low German pūs. However, it may have originated from the calling of cats, saying Psss! to get their attention.

Puss used as slang for mouth or face comes from the Irish bus, meaning lip or mouth.

Other lesser known usages of puss include:

  • An informal reference to a woman or girl, used affectionately. I personally would hate to be called a puss because of its similarity to pussy (see below).
  • Apparently the Brits also use it to mean a hare (a.k.a. rabbit). They call pretty much everything by weird names, but we’ll save that discussion for another time.

For those of you with your minds in the gutter, the word pussy also has two meanings, one in reference to a cat and the other to a woman’s naughty bits. Pussy as cat comes from the Old English pusa, meaning bag – which if you ask me, sounds closer to the other definition of pussy. Pusa was also used to refer to anything soft and cuddly – closer to a cat, but you be the judge of that.

Pussy meaning cunt may come from the Low German pūse (meaning vulva) or the Old Norse púss (meaning pocket or pouch). You could also use it as a reference to a woman, if you’re not being very polite.

So go out there and punch that puss in the puss with a pussy. Or not. You know, whatever suits your fancy. I don’t mean to be offensive here, but words tend to twist and turn their way from polite to crude in an instant.

Sources:

Note about photo: This is a picture of my ex-roommate’s cat Gizmo, who is a main coon with really creepy toddler-sized eyes.

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Incomplete Thoughts

I dreamt of lemon mousse tarts, Lucille Ball

And sweet-hearted redheads, girls I once called friends.

With my warrants paid, I’m finally free and

Pleased to go home in my black velvet dress,

Back to 1996 and memories.

 

Modern women argue with our dental insurance and volunteer

For Wisconsin nonprofits, shunning prophets-for-profits.

We take care of things, realising

Flooding facebook with chain letters is no kind of protest.

Us witches craft signs and flaunt ourselves out on the lawn

In front of white government buildings.

 

So here’s to you, Mrs. Robinson. You live in an unforgiving place.

Drink wine to forget all the pain, all the laughing.

They fluff your dress, fix your lipgloss,

And as you get sloshed they choose a jukebox tune

You never wanted to listen to.

Later, coherent but cranky, you ask for coffee.

 

I broadcast my problems on social media,

Seven black and white photos of my life.

The internet explodes my brain with the powers that be.

I pretend this day doesn’t exist.

My little sister ain’t little no more. She’s already learning

What it means to be.

 

Stop by and keep me busy.

Kick me while I’m on the ground already.

How could you ever want to date me?

When I met you, you asked me not to

Go into labor during your anti-bullying presentation.

It just didn’t – feel right

But I guess you’re not a little boy anymore.

 

I hope for my future daughter’s looks,

She should be beautiful and therefore respected

Able to hold her own at only eight weeks old.

For now, I’ll hide in my pillow pile until tomorrow

Wondering when and if my thoughts will ever be complete.

 

Note: This is a Facebook Poem – think magnetic poetry with social media. Of course, I mold and shape it to fit my purpose but the original inspiration is my friends’ status posts from October 21, 2017.

A quick update to my readers

I have always been an amateur etymologist, but I strive to be more academic in my endeavors. Today I’m looking for resources at the library and more reputable websites – no more urban dictionary and rube theories on ask.com! I might include them for giggles but that’s really not really what I’m going for.  So, my fellow word nerds, this is also a call for recommended sources if you have any.